Who gets cystic acne? What is it and how to treat it

Who gets cystic acne? What is it and how to treat it

Unfortunately, cystic acne can affect anyone. Cystic acne, or nodulocystic acne, is the most severe form of acne vulgaris. Deep, inflamed breakouts develop on the face and/or other areas of the body. The blemishes themselves can become large; some may measure up to several centimeters across. Although many people use the term "cystic" to describe any type of severely inflamed acne, only those who develop cysts truly have cystic acne. They feel like soft, fluid-filled lumps under the skin's surface. Cysts can be painful as they originate deeper in the skin than typical pimples and may also commonly produce scarring.

Contrary to common belief, squeezing an acne cyst can cause an even deeper infection and more painful inflammation spreading under the surface of the skin which can last much longer and lead to the development of additional cysts.

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What is Women Hormonal Acne?

What is Women Hormonal Acne?

The term “hormonal acne” may be a misnomer since most acne can be traced back to fluctuations in hormone levels.  A common misunderstanding is that men have testosterone and women have estrogen and progesterone; in reality, both genders have a balance of all 3.  The primary culprit in the formation of acne relates to fluctuations in androgens (male hormones) and in particular testosterone, DHEAS (dihyroepiandrosterone sulfate) and DHT (dehydrotestosterone). 

An elevation in these hormones can lead to the overstimulation of the sebaceous glands, and as a result to an over-production of sebum (skin oil) and the onset of acne formation. Too much sebum together with dead skin cells and dirt eventually leads to clogged pores, and this provides an ideal condition for the growth of bacteria (propionibacterium acnes) which secrete chemicals into the skin that stimulate an inflammatory response. These inflammatory responses are pimples, cysts, blackheads and whiteheads.

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Real Guys Don’t Have Acne - They have Razor Bumps Right? Wrong! Real Guys Have Acne too

Real Guys Don’t Have Acne - They have Razor Bumps  Right?  Wrong! Real Guys Have Acne too

More than 60 million adults in the US are diagnosed with acne, over 50% of adult women and 25% of adult men having this skin disease. The average age of an individual with acne problem is now, 26.5, while just 10 years ago it was 20.5.

So what other myths prevent men from having clear skin?

Acne is only for teens. If you toughen up and wait until those uncomfortable years are gone- acne problem will go away too.

Wrong!

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Hormonal Acne

Hormonal Acne

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the unpleasant and sometimes painful skin breakouts of acne can affect 40 to 50 million Americans. Acne is most common in teenagers, but it can affect people regardless of age.  Hormonal acne is practically acne caused by hormonal fluctuations. Acne can flare at any time, but people are particularly susceptible to it during certain phases of life, including, and perhaps most famously, during puberty and adolescence in general.


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Female Hormonal Acne

Female Hormonal Acne

As a general rule, women's hormones tend to fluctuate more than men's, which helps explain why acne in women tends to be less constant and more erratic than acne in men. More than half of all adult women experience at least occasional breakouts. Approximately 60-70% of women battle with acne experience premenstrual flare-ups. Acne can occur throughout a woman's adult life: in early adulthood, in the late twenties and thirties, during pregnancy, and during menopause. While female adult acne can be frustrating to deal with, it can be prevented and effectively treated.


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Acne versus Cold Sores

Sometimes people tend to confuse acne with cold sores. However, these are two different skin disorders. Even though, both skin conditions share certain common symptoms they have absolutely no similarity when it comes to causes and treatments.  By closely observing the symptoms, you will be able to distinguish between the two conditions. However, when doubt remains, a visit to your dermatologist can lead to a proper diagnosis and a recommendation for appropriate treatment. Cold sores and acne require different treatments, and improper treatment can slow down healing.


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Pre-Teen Acne

Pre-Teen Acne

The preteen period marks the transition from child to teenager. Acne is which is normally prevalent among teenagers is now affecting preteens as well. Acne in the preteen years would once have been considered distinctly unusual and a cause for concern. In fact, about 8 in 10 preteens and teens have acne, along with many adults. However, the reduction over the past 50 years in the average age at which puberty occur meaning that preteen acne is becoming increasingly common.


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Is Gluten Bad For Acne

Is Gluten Bad For Acne

A hot topic in the news lately has been whether or not gluten is a cause of acne. 

For those that do not have a gluten allergy called celiac disease, orgluten sensitivity, products containing gluten will NOT exasperate their acne problem.

Remember, diet does not cause acne, but exacerbates it.  To keep your body andskin healthy, a diet rich in probiotic bacteria and low in processedfoods (including sugar and saturated fats) is your skin's friend, andacne's enemy.



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Gluten and Acne

A hot topic in the news lately has been whether or not gluten is a cause of acne. We're here to set the record straight. For those that do not have a gluten allergy called celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity, products containing gluten will NOT exasperate their acne problem.

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